From Dave Kahle, Sales Resource Center

The biggest issue in the minds of your customers and prospects is not price, and it’s not value – it is risk. READ MORE

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From Tom Reilly

In the pre-technology days, salespeople relied on old-school methods to keep themselves and their territories organized. There were no cloud calendars, CRM, or sales force automation programs. There were no laptops, PDAs, or smart phones. No electronic alerts.

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From Tom Reilly

Mission-Men-Me

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From Tom Reilly

Imagine a steady flow of new business without peaks or valleys. Imagine the effect on your sales. Imagine the impact on your income.

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From Tom Reilly

Selling is more about solving and serving than providing products to prospects. There are three important questions that salespeople can ask to help customers. In Value-Added Selling, these are called Projective Questions.

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From Reilly Sales Training

During this time of year, we reflect on what really matters in life. We step back from the everyday hustle and bustle and focus on the importance of family, friends, and heavily discounted Black Friday deals.

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From Tom Reilly

"The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why." (Mark Twain)

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From Paul Reilly

In a recent Reilly Sales Training study, we asked salespeople about their personal purchasing behavior.

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From Tom Reilly

The brand of computer I prefer to use comes from Austin, Texas. The brand of motorcycle I prefer to ride comes from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The brand of beer I prefer to drink comes from St. Louis, Missouri. Okay, with beer, if someone else is buying, I’ll drink their label.

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By Paul Reilly

Here’s a familiar scenario…

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From Tom Reilly

A Google search for “Sales Secrets” yielded 18 million hits. One article offered 25 secrets. Really, that many secrets? There were multiple seven-secret articles and several three-secret articles. Why read a paltry three-secret article when a 25-secret article is available? Some are obvious to the point of embarrassment: Timing is everything, and only sell to people who want to buy. Most share common themes: Practice the A-B-C’s of selling—always be closing; People buy quarter-inch holes, not quarter-inch drills; and No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care. Some are downright ridiculous: Stay healthy, selling is good theatre, and be a happy loser.

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From Entrepreneur Magazine

New contacts are the source of potential future business -- if you bother to start to cultivate a relationship with them. Read More

From Paul Reilly

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.” Benjamin Franklin

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From Tom Reilly

All products are the same, except for the ways in which they are different.

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By Tom Reilly

Cheap prices seduce and delude. They scream as Sirens to price-sensitive shoppers and delude them into believing they are getting great deals because of the cheap prices. Cheap prices do not equate to great deals. Consider this:

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From Tom Reilly

“I want the truth.”

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From Tom Reilly

Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind. Rudyard Kipling

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From Tom Reilly

This is a war, a price war. You’re fighting an enemy, a pernicious challenger to your profitability. The battlefield is in your customer's head. Your opponent is price-shopper thinking.

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From TomReillyTraining.com

Always-Be-Closing. This phrase has been around for a while and popularized by Alec Baldwin in the 1992 film Glengarry Glen Ross. However, selling in today’s world is different. Selling is more than just closing.

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From Harvard Business Review

For decades, Sales and Academia remained worlds apart and the business world did fine. But Sales is changing, Academia is out of touch, and this is bad for business and the academy. Click here to read more